Ancient Traditions for Easter in Wales

Easter in Wales

Will you be spending Easter in Wales this year?  If you are here are some Welsh traditions you might find interesting about.

If you are renting a caravan in Wales over the Easter break, join with the locals and have some fun. There will be plenty of Easter parades and events across the region.

Good Friday

Good Friday (Dydd Gwener y Groglith) falls on 14 April this year and on this day the Welsh used to make their way to church barefoot so as not to unsettle the land.

Also on this day many children would be seen collecting reeds from the river to make a ‘bed for Christ’.  The reeds would be woven into an effigy of a man, who would be placed on a bed made from wood crosses. This would then be taken to a local pasture and laid there.

Easter Monday

You’ll have to get up early and have some energy to climb a mountain so that you will be in time to watch the sun rise. To be really traditional, take a pail of water with you to reflect the sun’s rays. When you reach the summit, somersault 3 times while the sun is rising. The reason it’s unlikely you’ll find anyone doing the latter today is because it’s dangerous!  Don’t even consider it without having a professional mountaineer with you!

Egg clapping (clapio wyau) is making a revival on Anglesey.  Dating back to the 1800s children would visit local farmers. Beating a wooden drum and singing was their way of asking the farmer for some eggs. The Mentor Mon organisation has begun an initiative to revive this practice on the island over the Easter break. Children will be led around villages clapping for eggs, having learned the traditional song. They’ll also listen to stories and participate in arts and crafts sessions.

Check out how people spent Easter in Wales in the 1950s by watching the video below:

Want to rent a caravan in Wales?

Search Rent My Caravan to book a caravan direct from owners. Easter in Wales is likely to be busy so make sure you book early to avoid disappointment.

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